Do your customers suffer from “E-fluenza”?

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Too much digital messaging drives us to distraction

Everyday the pipeline of digital messaging is expanding. And because of this, our ability to take in, absorb and comprehend is becoming less and less.

E-mail, text, social network advertising, CRM software, and websites are increasingly shouting to be heard above a sea of keyword flotsam and search terms.

What can marketers do to improve their digital messaging?

Simplify your message

Clarity of thought drives consistent messaging. Formulate your value proposition and concentrate on what you do well. If the reader has to think too much, odds are you will lose their attention. One test for simplifying your messaging – have a teenager read your website home page, then ask them what your company does.

Design for humans, not for bots and crawlers

Some web analysts claim that up to 65% of web traffic are bots and crawlers reporting back to search engines. That leaves 35% for human consumption. Humans are drawn to good design and content that connects on an emotional level. Highly visual websites that use strong imagery can convey more emotional connection than text-heavy analytical sites.

Understand your customer’s decision-making process

Arrange content in a natural flow that identifies customers’ concerns and problems, allowing customers to contemplate your solution through a linear progression of small steps. Using this approach builds customer confidence in your solution and reinforces their decision that your approach is best. Provide case studies, user reviews, and technical literature along the way as needed to confirm their decision. Consider providing a redeemable coupon to enhance the purchasing experience.

Build the relationship

There has to be a human connection to sustain a relationship. If not, then the purchasing decision is relegated to the lowest price to achieve the desired results. Improve brand consideration by communicating the brand story through thoughts and actions that resonate with the customer. Influence the purchasing decision by aligning with causes that benefit the industry as a whole.

The purchasing decision is a series of small steps, so make the steps easy and communicate in real terms, not industry jargon. Remember that no one wants to be sold to. The only one that receives any emotional benefit from that approach is the seller. Instead, assume the role of trusted advisor or consultant, enabling the purchaser to make their own decision based on the features, benefits, and solution that best fulfills their needs.

Simplifying your digital messaging and appealing to customers’ emotional needs is a sure cure for their “E-fluenza,” replacing their confusion with your solution.

Additional articles you may find of interest on this topic:

The Precarious State of Advertising & Marketing

Social media content strategy

RESPECT the customer

Please leave your comments or thoughts below.

Copyright: kozzi / 123RF Stock Photo

7 questions for better presentations

Successful presentations motivate the audience to take a specific action.

Successful presentations motivate the audience to take a specific action.

Create presentations that are more powerful and results oriented.

Successful presentations motivate the audience to take a specific action. It’s about presenting a solution based on a point-of-view that the audience can relate to on a personal and professional level.

Answer these 7 questions before scripting your presentation:

1. How large is the audience?

This is the fundamental starting point when developing the presentation. Is it a small group or an auditorium filled with thousands? The size of the audience helps determine the presentation tools to use.

2. Location?

The digital environment now provides for presentations to take place anywhere. Is the presentation a face-to face, webinar, or a posting to a social network? Popular platforms such as  Go-To-Meeting, Google Hangouts, or Slide Share  are accessible globally.

3. Who is the audience?

The basic premise, that the purpose of the presentation is to influence the audience’s behavior to take a desired action, requires understanding the audience’s ability to execute the action. In other words, make sure the presentation content is relevant to the audience.

4. What motivates the audience?

Motivation is best viewed through two lenses -the first being personal motivation, and the second, professional motivation. What concerns the person? What keeps them up at night? What business hurdles must they clear to reach success?

5. What is your desired action?

Margo Krasne, author of “Say It With Confidence,” refers to this as your “to-do.” What do you want your audience to do after you’ve finished speaking? This is the whole point of the presentation – to influence the audience to take a specific action. Always check your presentation content against the motivational carrots. Be sure it relates back to the audience’s concerns and presents a solution to their problem.

6. What is your presentation concept?

The concept is derived from the audience’s motivational carrots. What are they concerned about? How does the solution you are proposing satisfy their needs?

7. What is your presentation strategy?

Develop the content as a series of points supported by case studies, industry facts, or personal experiences.  Remember to portray your solution in context to solving the audience’s problems. Develop transition points that set up the next main point of the presentation.

Following these simple guidelines will help you create more powerful and results-oriented presentations.

Additional articles you may find of interest on this topic:

Connecting decision makers with your brand

Finding your voice

How to gain influence through understanding

Please leave your comments or thoughts below.